Reporting            

After his late morning meeting with Jim, Les sits down on a cold metal seat at the Euston bus station, 

nervously waiting for his bus. 

His downfilled blue anorak is so warm that he has to open it. He takes a folded copy of The Stage from the 

inside pocket and impatiently flicks through the pages. Having read a review on the latest Young Vic 

production of A Streetcar named Desire, he suddenly drops the magazine and glances at a young man sitting

a few empty seats away, checking his phone. Who is this tall youth with spiky hair? He looks vaguely familiar

but Les can’t place him. His bus, the 390 arrives. Clutching his paper, Les hurries to the driver’s door, his pass

ready. He stumbles to the upper deck and lets himself fall onto a seat at the back from where he can see the

passengers without being seen. The young man hasn’t got on the bus. Les wipes the window with his tartan

scarf and spots him. Down there he’s still in the same place, now speaking on his mobile. Les bites his lip and

remembers. He is one of his new A level students who should be in school. Since September Les has been 

teaching drama at the local Comprehensive in Camden. Today is his day off but it’s certainly not the 

student’s, whose name is on the tip of his tongue … Sam, yes, Sam Fleming, 17 years old. Les will have to 

report him to his form teacher, but before that he’s going to check out the pupil’s explanation for his 

absence.

Next day, back at school, Les looks through the files and learns that Sam lives with his aunt after a family 

break-up. 

Sam has given a bad cold as his excuse for staying home.

In the next drama class with Sam, Les gets the group of seven students to stage a scene on the theme “The 

importance of truth”. He puts Sam in charge of the production with the instruction that during the 

performance no word must be spoken.

After half an hour of lively discussions, improvisation and rehearsals, the students build the set of a court 

hearing, using five chairs and three desks. Two girls on the right form the jury. Two boys acting as Public 

Prosecutor and Defending Counsel take their seats behind desks facing the judge Justitia, acted by Julia, 

Les’s favourite student. She is blindfolded, stretching her arms out like the beams of a scale. In her right hand

she holds a white plastic tablet on which is written ‘TRUE’, in her left another one with the word ‘UNTRUE’. 

Enter Sam as a guard, leading in the defendant, a pale looking boy, whose wrists are tied together with a 

handkerchief, to one corner of the court room. The Prosecutor heaves himself up, and with grand gestures 

does his best to ingratiate himself with the jury and the judge Justitia. Next, he repeatedly stabs his finger in

the direction of the defendant, accusing him of much more than a single offence. After his silent speech he 

wipes some imaginary sweat from his forehead and takes a welldeserved seat. Now it’s the Defending 

Counsel’s turn. He gets up modestly, approaches the defendant and introduces him to the jury and the 

judge. Justitia’s arms go up and down, unsure about whose arguments weigh more. The defendant, 

answering his Counsel’s questions, is getting more and more confident. The Defending Counsel returns to 

his desk. Addressing the jury, he pleads for the defendant’s innocence, nods gratefully and sits down. Now 

the two jury members enter into a mute discussion and come to a conclusion. One of them walks to the 

judge and whispers their verdict in her ear. Justitia’s right hand, holding the ‘TRUE’ tablet sinks, while her left

hand goes up. Clearly, truth weighs more than untruth. Justitia takes off her blindfold, addresses the 

defendant with reassuring voiceless words and ends the hearing. The Defending Counsel, overjoyed, jumps 

up and shakes the defendant’s hand as soon as the guard Sam has untied his cuffs. Chatting, all leave the 

court and classroom for a minute before they return, applauded by their drama teacher.

After the lesson, Les asks Sam to stay behind for a word.

‘Well done Sam, that was a fine performance in which you demonstrated that truth always outweighs 

deception.’

Sam, while enjoying the praise, pulls up his shoulders awaiting some critique.

Les, who is just five years older than Sam, takes a breath. ‘But why is it that you yourself lied to the school 

about why you were away yesterday?’

Sam blushes slightly but seems determined not to be put off his guard. 

‘Maybe I should have said that I met some mates in the park to have a few drinks.’

Les is taken aback but Sam carries on. ‘You weren’t in school either. I saw you at the bus station.’

‘Now come on, Sam, it was my day off.’

Sam smiles charmingly. ‘It was mine too.’

‘I disagree.’

In an instant Sam’s charm falls away. ‘You might disagree. But what were you up to? I saw you buying some 

dope from a geezer.’

Les feels the blood leave his head, struggling to find an answer, so Sam carries on.

‘I’m considering reporting you to the Head.’

Now Les feels the blood returning to his cheeks. He folds his arms.

Sam flashes a smile. ‘Unless … you’ve got any to spare of that stuff.’